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The Bourne Archive


Lincolnshire Special Constabulary Bulletin No. 27 – September, 1942


Warfare

LINCOLNSHIRE SPECIAL CONSTABULARY.

County Constabulary Headquarters,

LINCOLN.

5th. October, 1942.

BULLETIN NO: 27 : SEPTEMBER, 1942.

The number of Special Constables reported as having performed effective duty this month is 3,763. 569 special constables completed their training in regard to the new type of Incendiary Bombs, and 7 in Police Duties.

Division

No. sworn in

H.E. & I.B.

Anti-Gas

Police Duties

First Aid

Cleethorpes

510

202

387

401

378

Gainsborough

433

67

417

417

406

Louth

463

80

378

305

304

Scunthorpe

619

220

444

420

346

Skegness

347

-

244

333

229

Sleaford

377

-

303

322

297

Stamford

412

-

365

342

320

Spalding

649

-

527

556

447

         Total

3810

569

3065

3096

2727

 

The following members of the service have been thanked during the month of September, 1942:-

Special Constables C. Andrews and F. G. Plaskitt, for their good work in excluding unauthorised persons from the scene of the German aircraft crash as Aylesby.

Special Constable A. Barks of the Skegness Division, for his good work in searching over a wide area and later recapturing at Stickney, a youth who had escaped from the North Sea Camp, Frieston. 1

Special Constables H. R. Dick, R. A. Gilbert, J. W. E. Hawley, H. C. L. Hibbitt and H. Warren of the Stamford Division, for the valuable assistance they rendered to the regular police in a case of gaming at Stamford.

Inspector F. L. Gutteridge and Special Constable A. Gadsby of the Stamford Division, for the prompt manner in which they came to the assistance of the regular police in dealing with two violent Czechoslovakian airmen.

Special Constable R. Lockwood of Cleethorpes Division, for his good work in detaining the crew of a German aircraft which crashed in Alyesby.

Sergeants F. A. Mann and J. W. Sargeant of the Skegness Division, for valuable assistance rendered by them, and the men of their sections, in turning out at a late hour and searching for two youths who had escaped from the North Sea Camp at Frieston.

Special Constable F. Oldham of the Sleaford Division, for his keen observation and attention to duty in detecting the larceny of cash from a workman’s coat pocket at North Hykeham.

Special Constable E. L. Tupholme of the Stamford Division, for his good work and initiative in detecting two youths stealing apples at Bourne.

Special Constable C. A. Wallis of the Gainsborough Division, for his observation and attention to duty, in detecting a number of boys committing wilful damage to crops at Bunkers Hill.

ACTIVITIES OF THE SERVICE

(a)           Proceedings originated by Special Constables

Division

Cleethorpes

Gainsborough

Louth

Scunthorpe

Skegness

Sleaford

Stamford

Spalding

TOTAL

Proceedings under the Lighting Order

4

16

4

15

13

48

8

13

121

Other summary Proceedings

2

25

0

3

4

12

8

4

58

(b)          Other Duties Performed

On the 27th September, 1942, the special constables at Brigg took part in a combined Military and Civil Defence exercise. The special constables at Scunthorpe assisted in a Civil Defence exercise on 23rd September, 1942. On the 8th September, a combined invasion exercise was held at Great Gonerby, and the special constables who took part were complimented in regard to their work, especially in the subjects of Gas and First-Aid. The special constables at Coningsby, Tattershall and Tattershall Thorpe took part in an exercise on 25th August, and despite the inclement weather the exercise was carried out satisfactorily. Exercises in which the special constables have taken part have been held at Billingborough, Folkingham and Langtoft.

(c)           Social

Dances have been organised by the special constables at Scunthorpe and Ashby, a large proportion of the proceeds being donated to the Scunthorpe War Memorial Hospital.

SPECIAL NOTICE

The Paper Controller has intimated that the Special Constables’ Bulletin is subject to the restrictions imposed by article 1 (i) (a) of the Control of Paper (No. 36) Order, 1941. Accordingly, it can no longer be published as a periodical, and, in the present form, this will be its last issue. Administrative Orders, information relating to enemy activities and instructional articles on police work will, in future, be issued to the special constabulary in the form of training pamphlets as and when required. 2

WEARING OF GUMBOOTS 3

The attention of all special constables is once more directed to the order that, owing to the rubber shortage, gumboots in their possession are only to be worn as a protection against gas and must not be used for any other purpose, whatever the weather conditions might be.

RETURNS OF HOURS OF DUTY

In some country sections, returns of the hours of duty performed have not been submitted promptly, with the result that the applications of the other sections for boot allowance have been held up. Sergeants and Inspectors are requested to see that there is as little delay as possible in this connection.

TRAINING FIGURES-INCENDIARY BOMBS

All special constables will observe that the old training figures for H.E. and I.B. training have been cancelled. As is the case with the other services, no member of the special constabulary can now be considered as trained until he has attended a lecture of one hour’s duration on the new German incendiary bombs, in addition to previous instruction laid down for these subjects.

NIGHT PLOUGHING

The Ministry of Home Security have amended the law relating to the lights which may be carried by tractors and the following is a copy of Home Security Circular 171/1942, dated 31st August, 1942, which explains the position fully.

“1. In order to facilitate night ploughing it has been decided that tractors being used for any agricultural purpose otherwise than on a road should be permitted to display, instead of the lights authorised under paragraph 51 of the Lighting (Restrictions) Order, 1940, two masked headlamps complying with sub-paragraphs (b), (c), (d) and (e) of paragraph 17 of the Order.

2.  The lamps, one of which will show light to the front and one to the rear of the tractor, may be mounted on any part of the tractor and the beam directed in accordance with the wishes of the driver, provided that no direct light is projected above the horizontal.

3.  In addition, the driver of the tractor may use, when necessary for carrying out adjustments, etc., a torch or handlamp not complying with paragraph 50 of the Lighting (Restrictions) Order, 1940, as amended, provided that it is hooded with a semi-circular hood projecting at least three inches, that, if electric, it is of a power not exceeding 1 watt, and that the light emitted is white and is at all times directed downwards.

4.  The necessary amendments to the Lighting Order will be made in due course. Neither relaxation will apply within half-a-mile of an R.A.F. Aerodrome.

5.  This circular is issued by direction of the Ministry of Home Security.”

GAS POINTS FOR WARDENS

A note on “Gas Points for Wardens” issued by the Inspector-General of the C.D. Services, is appended hereunder for the information of all special constables.

“1.  A gas bomb will presumably be heard by wardens as it falls. It will not explode with the violence of an H.E. bomb.

2.  The warden relies on his sense of smell to detect gas. If this is acute he should carry the respirator at the ‘Alert,’ being prepared to stop breathing for a few seconds while he puts the respirator on if gas is detected. Otherwise wardens may prefer to seek gas whilst wearing the respirator, testing for gas in the prescribed manner.

3.  Once a warden is reasonably certain that gas is present the rattles should be sounded vigorously. After the initial sounding to warn the neighbourhood the warden should, if necessary, continue to sound the rattle at intervals, particularly whenever pedestrians or traffic approach the danger area. A report should be made at the first opportunity but the main effort of the wardens should, however, be directed from the first suspicion of gas to warning the public (a) to put on their respirators, (b) to take immediate cover and remain there until the danger has passed.

4.  Under favourable weather conditions the greatest danger arises with non-persistent lethal gas. A dangerous gas cloud of this kind from a single bomb may take 5 minutes to pass a given spot, whilst it is still of lethal concentration. At high wind speeds the rate of travel is faster and the time of exposure is correspondingly shorter.

5.  Should blister gas be used, the warden has to discover where the contamination has occurred and isolate the area. From a 50 kilo bomb falling in a street the splashed area should not extend more than 15 or 20 yards along the street. Traffic, particularly downwind, should at first be stopped much further away, say 100 yards. At this distance respirators must still be worn to protect the eyes and lungs from vapour, but no other protection is necessary, provided the period of exposure does not exceed about 15 minutes. If a warden has to remain on duty in the area for longer than this he should wear anti-gas clothing.

6.  The need to protect the eyes is paramount. Once the enemy has used gas, wardens should always wear eyeshields when on patrol.”

UNEXPLODED BOMBS AND PARACHUTE MINES

The following are the new safety distances for Unexploded Bombs and Parachute Mines and are appended for information.

Unexploded Bombs

The distinction between a “buried bomb” and an “unexploded bomb” will be that the bomb may be treated as “buried” unless it is above ground level or some part of it is still visible.

For all buried bombs the following precautions must be taken :-

(a)  Initial Evacuation.  All buildings within 50 yards of the bomb should be cleared. In unevacuated houses within 100 yards of the bomb the rooms on the same side of the building as the bomb should not be used.

(b) Opening of Windows.  In order to reduce the risk of injury form glass all windows in the walls of the buildings on the same side as and within 100 yards of the bomb, should be opened wide.

(c)  Traffic Restrictions.  No vehicular or pedestrian traffic should be allowed within 50 yards of the bomb. Between 50 yards and 100 yards of the bomb, traffic should be confined to persons or vehicles requiring access to the unevacuated houses, which should be entered by a door on the side of the building remote from the bomb.

For unburied bombs of 1800 kg. or more :-

(a)  Initial Evacuation.  All buildings including industrial premises within 200 yards of the bomb must be evacuated. Rooms must be vacated up to 400 yards from the bomb site if they have either exposed doors or windows unscreened from the bomb site by intervening buildings, of it screened from the bomb site only by flimsy constructions such as walls of asbestos-cement or corrugated iron sheeting, lat and plaster partitions, etc.

(b)   Windows.  Windows within 800 yards of the bomb should be opened wide.

(c)  Traffic.  No vehicular traffic and no pedestrian traffic (other than persons requiring access to the unevacuated houses within the area) should be allowed within 300 yards of the bomb unless screened by intervening buildings of brick walls. If so screened, the distance may be reduced to 200 yards.

In all other cases of unburied bombs :-

(a)  Initial Evacuation.  All buildings should be cleared up to 50 yards from bombs up to 250 kg. and up to 100 yards for bombs over that size. Rooms must be vacated up to 150 yards from bombs up to 250 kg. and for 300 yards for bombs of more than 25o kg., if they have either exposed doors or windows unscreened from the bomb site by intervening buildings, of it screened from the bomb site only by flimsy constructions such as walls of asbestos-cement or corrugated iron sheeting, lat and plaster partitions, etc.

(b)  Opening of Windows.  Windows should be opened wide in rooms referred to in sub-para. (a) above, and preferably to rather greater distance.

(c)  Traffic Restrictions.  No vehicular traffic and no pedestrian traffic other than persons requiring access to the unevacuated houses within the area should be allowed within 300 yards of the bomb unless screened by intervening buildings of brick walls. If so screened, the distance may be reduced to 100 yards for bombs over 250 kg. and to 50 yards for bombs of 250 kg. or less.

Relaxation of safety precautions.

The following relaxations may subsequently be made in the case of buried bombs :-

(i)  All safety precautions may be relaxed and occupants may return to their houses 96 hours after a bomb falls unless a railway, including an underground railway, passes within 50 yards of the bomb, in which case full restrictions must be maintained until the bomb is finally disposed of.

(ii)  The following immediate relaxations may be permitted where a buried bomb can be certified by a Bomb Disposal Officer, R.E., as of 50 kg. :-

(a)  Evacuation.  The measure of relaxation of safety precautions will vary with circumstances, but it should be possible to allow the immediate re-occupation of all houses except those within 10 yards.

(b)  Windows.  Where persons are allowed to return to their houses, windows need no longer be kept open.

(c)  Traffic.  Traffic may be allowed to pas unless the bomb is within 10 yards of the road.

In the case of unburied bombs none of the safety precautions must be relaxed until the bomb is rendered safe.

Parachute Mines

The following rules for safety precautions in the case of unexploded Parachute Mines should be strictly observed :-

(i)  All buildings including industrial premises within 200 yards of the mine must be evacuated. No loud noise or vibration must be caused within 400 yards of the mine, and this restriction will normally involve the cessation of industrial work up to that distance.

(ii)  Rooms must be vacated up to 44 yards from the mine site if they have either exposed doors or windows unscreened from the mine site by intervening buildings, or if screened only by flimsy constructions such as walls of asbestos-cement or corrugated iron sheeting, lath and plaster partitions, etc.

(iii)  All windows within 800 yards of the mine should be opened wide.

(iv)  No traffic will be allowed within 400 yards of the mine except pedestrians requiring access to the unevacuated houses which should preferably be entered by a door on the side of the building remote from the mine. This restriction applies also to rail traffic and to vehicles of the armed forces.

(v)  Fire fighting, rescue work and first-aid will be allowed to continue where necessary within the area evacuated.

(vi)  No stakes are to be driven into the ground (e.g., for the purpose of making barriers) within 400 yards of a mine which has not been rendered safe for transportation.

(vii)  When a mine has been rendered safe for transportation a barrier must be erected round it to prevent people touching it.

REPORTING OF INCENDIARY BOMBS

To avoid confusion, the following abbreviations should be used in the future to report the fall of Incendiary Bombs to Report Centres and Police Stations.

              1 kg. with explosive tail                                                    EXP. I.B.

              1 kg. with explosive nose                                                  IBEN

              H.E.-cum-Incendiary (marked Spreng-brand C.50)4    Firepot I.B.

              Phosphorous Oil Bomb                                                    PH. I.B.

DISPOSAL OF UNIGNITED INCENDIARY BOMBS

Should an unexploded bomb be identified as a 50 kg. phosphorous-oil bomb special precautions may be necessary. If the bomb is found intact it will be dealt with by the Bomb Disposal Unit as in the case of and H.E. bomb. Should, however, the case have been split open on impact and any of the contents be spilled, it will be necessary to keep all exposed portions of the filling wet, pending the arrival of the Bomb Disposal Unit. The latter will be responsible for uncovering the bomb and rendering it safe, insofar as the fuse and any explosive charge is concerned. Where the bomb can be allowed to burn under control without causing serious damage to property this course will be followed. In all other cases the N.F.S. will be responsible for the subsequent disposal of the incendiary material. Until this task can conveniently be undertaken, Wardens and Fire Guards should be employed to keep wet all exposed portions of the filling. Care must be taken not to touch the bomb or its contents.

Unignited incendiary bombs of the 1 kg. type or any of its variants should be picked up by hand, carried horizontally, and deposited outside buildings. The local authority or by the police will then remove them to a place of safety. They should preferably be stored in a shallow trench in open ground to which access by unauthorised persons prohibited. With certain types of filling used in these bombs, drying out after immersion in water may cause spontaneous ignition or even explosion.  They should not therefore be immersed in water but should be kept dry until they can be collected by the Bomb Disposal Units which are responsible for their ultimate disposal. Unignited bombs which, however, have fallen in water or have for any reason become wet, should be kept in water until they can be collected by the Bomb Disposal Unit. The above instructions apply also to unignited 1 kg. incendiary bombs with an explosive nose but it is important that they should be reported immediately by the police so that they may be collected by Bomb Disposal Units at the earliest opportunity.

BLACK-OUT AND LIGHTING-UP TIMES

Date

a.m.

p.m.

Date

a.m.

p.m.

15th October

6.58

6.37

16th November

7.58

5.35

16th

7.00

6.35

17th

7.59

5.34

17th

7.01

6.33

18th

8.02

5.34

18th

7.03

6.30

19th

8.04

5.31

19th

7.05

6.28

20th

8.06

5.29

20th

7.07

6.26

21st

8.07

5.28

21st

7.09

6.23

22nd

8.09

5.27

22nd

7.11

6.21

23rd

8.11

5.26

23rd

7.13

6.19

24th

8.12

5.24

24th

7.14

6.17

25th

8.14

5.24

25th

7.16

6.15

26th

8.15

5.23

26th

7.18

6.13

27th

8.17

5.22

27th

7.20

6.11

28th

8.19

5.21

28th

7.22

6.09

29th

8.20

5.20

29th

7.23

6.07

30th

8.22

5.19

30th

7.25

6.06

1st December

8.24

5.18

31st

7.28

6.03

2nd

8.25

5.17

1st November

7.30

6.01

3rd

8.27

5.16

2nd

7.32

5.59

4th

8.28

5.16

3rd

7.33

5.57

5th

8.29

5.16

4th

7.35

5.55

6th

8.31

5.15

5th

7.37

5.54

7th

8.32

5.15

6th

7.39

5.52

8th

8.33

5.14

7th

7.41

5.50

9th

8.34

5.14

8th

7.42

5.48

10th

8.35

5.14

9th

7.45

5.46

11th

8.37

5.13

10th

7.47

5.44

12th

8.38

5.13

11th

7.49

5.43

13th

8.39

5.13

12th

7.51

5.41

14th

8.40

5.13

13th

7.52

5.40

15th

8.41

5.13

14th

7.54

5.38

16th

8.42

5.13

15th

7.56

5.37

17th

8.43

5.13

 

 [Facsimile signature] R. H. Fooks

Chief Constable.

J.W. Ruddock & Sons, Ltd., Printers, Lincoln 22251


Commentary

From early in the Second World War, after the Fall of France, special constables (part-time volunteer policemen) in Lincolnshire were informed of wartime developments and their morale maintained, by a small (typically 8 pp. 215 x 139 mm) booklet, issued to them by Lincolnshire Constabulary. The earlier issues were however, foolscap sheets (328 x 203 mm), stapled together at the top left corner. It appeared monthly until No. 27, the present issue, when restrictions on the use of paper ended its run.

Abbreviations :-

A.R.P. = Air Raid Precautions – This was a branch of the Civil Defence organisation, as well as the precautions themselves.

C.D. = Civil Defence.

H.E. = high explosive.

H.M. Forces = His Majesty’s Forces.

I.B. = incendiary bomb.

N.F.S. = National Fire Service. This replaced the local authority organization of fire services and the Auxiliary Fire Service (A.F.S.).

R.A.F. = Royal Air Force.

Footnotes

1.^     This is on the north side of the mouth of Boston Haven. At this period, it was a Borstal institution. Youths frequently absconded from it. It was at around the time of the leaflet or a little before, that one of those absconders stole an old coat from my parents’ back porch in Skirbeck (RJP4). Freiston is the usual spelling of the parish’s name.

2.^    These instructional pamphlets were just like the bulletins but they were produced slightly irregularly: about once in two months. The first is dated 19th November, 1942.

3.^    The great frugality in the use of paper which ended publication of the bulletin and the care in the use of rubber illustrate the shortages from which the country suffered at this period. Rubber was product of the tropics and 1942 was a particularly difficult time with regard to the German blockade of Britain. A counter blockade of Germany led to a similar shortage there. This and the overrunning of the rubber plantations of the Far East by Japan led both these European countries and the USA to try to develop synthetic rubber.

4.^    Sprengen = to blow up or explode: ein Brand = fire out of control (burning houses etc.) cf. French incendie.


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