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The Bourne Archive


Lincolnshire Special Constabulary Instructional Pamphlet No.6 – August, 1943


Warfare

LINCOLNSHIRE SPECIAL CONSTABULARY.

County Constabulary Headquarters,

LINCOLN.

5th. August, 1943.

INSTRUCTIONAL PAMPHLET NO: 6

1. REST-HOUSE ACCOMMODATION FOR CIVIL DEFENCE WORKERS

With reference to item No. 3 of Instructional Pamphlet No. 4, 1 in addition to the convalescent facilities offered to Civil Defence Workers, including Special Constables, Police Auxiliaries and Police Messengers, by the War Organisation of the British Red Cross Society and the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, Rest-house accommodation is now also provided for Special Constables, Police Messengers and Police Auxiliaries. It is a service designed for men and women suffering form fatigue, over-strain or generally in need of recuperative rest which they could not obtain otherwise: it gives that thorough rest and change needed by personnel who are “run-down,” not necessarily on account of their Civil Defence duties, to restore their health with the minimum cost, suffering and loss of man-power.

The accommodation is free and, in cases of real need, part of whole of the patients fare can be paid. Patients can be accommodated during their annual leave period in addition to compassionate or sick leave and, under exceptional circumstances (i.e., after a severe raid when a man cannot leave his wife in the vulnerable area) wives can be taken with husbands. The rules are few and such as obtain in any comfortable private house. The food is ample and good, and special care is given to any patient suffering from a nervous illness and general debility. Persons who normally would go to paying guest accommodation and who, under the present conditions, cannot find this, are permitted to pay towards their board and lodgings if they will discuss this privately with the Warden in charge of the House. The Rest-houses are large private houses (the one in this Region being situated at Quorn, Leicestershire), which have been lent by their owners, the most friendly atmosphere prevails and every effort is made to build up health and morale. The normal period of accommodation is from a week to a fortnight.

It is wished to emphasize that this is a genuine offer of assistance to those persons who, even owing to their normal work, as distinct from their duties, find themselves in need of recuperative rest, and it is hoped that personnel will avail themselves, where necessary, of the excellent facilities available.

Any person who is desirous of taking advantage of these facilities should take up the matter with the Superintendent of the Division, who will provide him with the necessary application forms and will advise him as to how it is to be completed.

Attention is drawn to the fact that those persons who require continuous medical attention after illness should avail themselves of the facilities offered at a convalescent home and not at one of the Rest-houses (for details see item 3 of Instructional Pamphlet No.4). 1

2. LABELLING OF CASUALTIES AND THE DEAD

(i)  The attention of Special Constables is drawn to the importance of labelling correctly certain types of air raid casualties and all dead bodies before they are removed from the incident. If this is done unnecessary delays in treatment and identification will be avoided.

(ii)  The instructions for labelling casualties and the dead in Bulletins Nos. 6 and 10 are cancelled.2 Labels are being printed and will be issued to all ranks as soon as possible. Particular attention is drawn to the new instructions on the marking of casualties burnt by phosphorus and the labelling of unconscious persons.

(iii)  It is not necessary for all causalities to be labelled, nor invariably for particulars of their names and addresses to be taken; but certain types of casualty, as mentioned in paragraph (v), and all dead bodies should be specially labelled before being removed from the incident.

(iv)  Tie-on labels, with a symbol written on them, should be used; failing this a piece of paper attached to a button or pinned to the clothing will serve. If possible, the forehead of the casualty should also be marked with indelible pencil with the same symbol.

(v)  The symbols used for marking casualties and their interpretation, are as follows:-

Symbol on label and/or forehead

Interpretation

X

Requires priority of removal from the incident and examination when reaching hospital. This is used mainly, but not exclusively, for wounds of the chest and abdomen, for internal haemorrhage and for all unconscious casualties.

T

A tourniquet has been applied. The time of application of the tourniquet and subsequent releases should be indicated on the label.

H

Severe haemorrhage has occurred.

M

Morphine has been given. The time and [sic] administration and dose should be written on the label.

C

Contaminated, or suspected of having been contaminated, by PERSISTENT GAS.

XX

Poisoned, or suspected of having been poisoned, by phosgene or other non-persistent gas.

P

Burnt by phosphorus.

 

As mentioned in the preceding paragraph, all unconscious casualties should be marked X, and the label tied on the casualty should bear on the reverse the following information:-

(a) The address of the premises where the casualty was found.

(b) The position in the building (if this can be defined).

(c) The time and date when found.

(d) Any other special information which might assist in identifying the casualty (e.g., name, if known).

When dead bodies are recovered, a label bearing the following information should be firmly tied to a part of the body or clothing of the deceased; special printed or typed labels should be supplied for this purpose by local or scheme-making authorities and each should be signed by the leader or the deputy leader of the party effecting recovery.

The address of the premises where the body was recovered.

The position in the building (if this can be defined).

The time and date when recovered.

Apparent cause of death (e.g., bomb splinters, falling masonry, fire, etc.)

Any other special information which might assist in identifying the body e.g., name of casualty, if known.).

If the body is contaminated , or suspected of being contaminated, with phosphorus, the label should be clearly marked “P.”

For those suspected to have died from the effects of poisoning by phosgene or other non-persistent gases, the label should be clearly marked “XX.”

3.      DISCUSSIONS OF MATTERS AFFECTING THE WELFARE AND EFFICIENCY OF PART-TIME SPECIAL CONSTABLES

In view of the valuable unpaid services which the Special Constabulary are rendering, the probability that the calls upon them will increase in the future, and the restrictions of their freedom to resign as a result of the Police (Employment and Offences) Orders, the Secretary of State for Home Affairs has directed, after consultation with Chief Constables, that there should be some recognised procedure by which part-time Special Constables may bring to the notice of Police Authorities and Chief Constables general matters affecting their welfare and efficiency.

In this county the meetings of Special Constables, which are held periodically in Divisions, provide opportunities for the expression of views, and Special Constables are reminded that resolutions on matters affecting their welfare and efficiency (other than questions of promotion and discipline affecting individuals) may be submitted through their own superior officers to the chief Constable, who will, in appropriate cases, bring such matters to the notice of the Police Authority.

A Conference of Senior Officers of the Special Constabulary will be held at Headquarters, Lincoln, at intervals of six months, at which representative senior officers from the Divisions will attend. At this Conference, a senior officer will be nominated to attend a District Conference of Special Constabulary Commandants.

The District Conference will consist of Commandants, or other senior officers, of the Special Constabulary of this and adjoining forces, and it will meet twice a year on the strict understanding that the discussions will be confined to matters connected with the organisation of the Special Constabulary, and, in particular, will not extend to general questions of police administration. It will not be within their province to comment on the decisions of particular police authorities or Chief Constables, but it will be open to them to submit to District Conference of Chief Constables for their consideration general suggestions for the improvement of the existing organisation, and for this purpose minutes of the meeting and a note of the conclusions reached will be forwarded to the Secretary of the District Conference of Chief Constables.

Attendance at a recognised meeting of Senior Officers will be regarded as an occasion of duty, for payment of travelling expenses and allowances, where appropriate.

The arrangements outlined above apply to Part-time Special Constables only, as whole-time Special Constables belong to the Auxiliary Police Association.

Note.-The first Headquarters Conference of senior officers of the Special Constabulary took place at 7 p.m. on Thursday, the 5th August, when S/C Superintendent A. W. White, of Spalding, was elected to represent the Lincolnshire Special Constabulary at the bi-annual District Conferences, the first of which was held on Saturday, the 7th August, 1943.

4.      TREATMENT OF PHOSPHORUS BURNS

With reference to Instructional Pamphlet No. 1, item 1, further consideration has been given to the treatment of Phosphorus Burns and the following procedure should now be adopted.

At the Incident

(i)   Apply water immediately to the affected part, to extinguish any burning phosphorus and to keep the area moist (water from the water bottle may be used for this purpose).

(ii)  Apply a clean field dressing, or clean lint, or clean cloth soaked in water over the burn. Whatever dressing is used it must be kept wet, as otherwise it may burst into flame.

(iii) With the wet dressing in place, the casualty, if a sitting case, or able to walk, should be conveyed or directed at once to the nearest First-Aid Post for further treatment.

(iv) Stretcher cases must be sent direct to a hospital with the least possible delay. To ensure immediate attention at the hospital, these casualties must be labelled, and the label marked with a P. The attention of the ambulance attendant must be drawn to the case.

5.      TREATMENT OF CLOTHING CONTAMINATED WITH PHOSPHORUS

(1)     Clothing lightly splashed with phosphorus should be kept in a wetted condition until all trace of the phosphorus can be sponged off, using plenty of warm water at a temperature of not less than 50 C. Cleansing must be thorough; the presence of any overlooked traces of phosphorus will be revealed by fuming and the typical smell of white phosphorus when it is exposed to the air to dry. Also, in the dark, the greenish phosphorescent glow will show up even small traces of unremoved contamination.

(2)     Outer clothing should be treated as described above, but if badly splashed, it may prove impossible to eliminate the phosphorus by sponging, and the clothing should be burned.

(3)     Underclothing can be washed in warm water in the usual way using several changes of rinsing water. It should be carefully inspected for last traces of phosphorus, and until washed, should be kept wet. The small amount of phosphorus present will not harm the washer in any way and the washing and rinsing water and rinsing water can safely be thrown down the drain.

(4)     There are a number of solvents which would remove phosphorus from soiled clothing, but in view of the danger of fire with most of them, the only ones which can be recommended for this purpose are carbon tetrachloride and tetrachlorethane. Where solvents are used, it is necessary:-

(a)  To use a sufficient volume to ensure complete solution;

(b)  to treat sufficiently wide area, because the solvent may tend to spread the phosphorus;

(c)   to dispose of the solvent in an appropriate manner, because the used solvent will contain phosphorus which will be left behind on evaporation.

6.      ACTIVITIES OF THE SERVICE

(a)                 Proceedings originated by Special Constables

Division

Cleethorpes

Gainsborough

Louth

Scunthorpe

Skegness

Sleaford

Stamford

Spalding

TOTAL

June

Proceedings under the Lighting Order

1

0

0

3

0

5

0

2

11

Other Statutory Proceedings

0

3

3

7

1

12

1

1

28

July

Proceedings under the Lighting Order

0

0

0

4

0

4

5

1

14

Other Statutory Proceedings

0

3

1

2

1

2

4

3

16

(b)                Other Duties Performed

The Special Constables at Ingham took part in a Civil Defence exercise on 6th June, 1943.

Special Constables of the Welton and Saxilby sections took part in a Royal Air Force exercise and performed very good work.

On the 20th June, 1943, the Special Constables of the Wildmore beat took part in a Civil Defence exercise and co-operated with other services very successfully. The Special Constables of Harlaxton, Barrowby, Denton and Woolsthore-by-Belvoir took part in a Home Guard combined exercise on 27th June, 1943, whilst others from Claypole and Long Bennington took part in a ”Hiker” exercise.

On the 2nd August, 1943, 85 members of the Special Constabulary of the Spalding Division performed duty in connection with the Red Cross Agriculture Fund Fκte at Holbeach, which was visited by Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Gloucester and attended by some 14,000 persons. During the function no crime was committed and no untoward incident occurred, which is a great tribute to the vigilance of the Special Constabulary.

(c)                 Commendations

The following special Constables have been thanked for their services:-

All Special Constables of Cleethorpes Town, in connection with the air raids on 14th June and 13th July, 1943.

Inspector H. Fowler and the men of Great Coates Section, for duty performed in the air raid of 14th June, 1943.

In both these cases the Special Constables turned out and performed duty for a considerable time during the raid and also for a considerable time after the raid locating U.X.A.P.B.’s at great personal risk. 3

Special Constable A. Cox of the Stamford Division, for searching the countryside and recapturing three youths who had escaped from Hereward Approved School, Bourne. 4

Sergeant Tidswell and Special Constable Charles F. Hatton, of Stamford Division, for searching the countryside and recapturing and escaped Italian prisoner of war.

Special Constable Arthur Herbert Thorley of Spalding Division, for the detection of a man for larceny of hen eggs from farm buildings.

Inspector Ronald Richardson of Cleethorpes Division, for interrogating and obtaining particulars from a workman which resulted in the man being arrested and charged with larceny.

Special Constable Sydney Waltham of Spalding Division, for searching the West Pinchbeck area and arresting two soldiers for house-breaking.

Superintendent A. W. White, Inspector F. Dodd and other ranks of the Spalding, Holbeach and Long Sutton sections, for their excellent work in Connection with the Red Cross Agriculture Fund Fκte at Holbeach on the 2nd August, 1943.

BLACK-OUT AND LIGHTING-UP TIMES

Black-out Times 5

Date

a.m.

p.m.

Date

a.m.

p.m.

1st August

5.31

10.44

1st September

5.40

8.23

2nd “

5.33

10.42

2nd “

5.42

8.21

3rd “

5.35

10.40

3rd “

5.44

8.18

4th “

5.37

10.38

4th “

5.45

8.16

5th “

5.39

10.36

5th “

5.47

8.14

6th “

5.40

10.34

6th “

5.49

8.11

7th “

5.42

10.32

7th “

5.50

8.9

8th “

5.43

10.31

8th “

5.52

8.7

9th “

5.45

10.29

9th “

5.54

8.4

10th “

5.47

10.27

10th “

5.55

8.2

11th “

5.49

10.25

11th “

5.57

7.59

12th “

5.51

10.22

12th “

5.59

7.56

13th “

5.53

10.20

13th “

6.1

7.54

14th “

5.54

10.18

14th “

6.3

7.52

15th “

5.11

9.1

15th “

6.4

7.49

16th “

5.12

8.59

16th “

6.6

7.47

17th “

5.14

8.57

17th “

6.8

7.45

18th “

5.16

8.55

18th “

6.9

7.42

19th “

5.17

8.53

19th “

6.11

7.40

20th “

5.19

8.50

20th “

6.13

7.37

21st “

5.21

8.48

21st “

6.15

7.34

22nd “

5.23

8.46

22nd “

6.17

7.32

23rd “

5.25

8.43

23rd “

6.18

7.30

24th “

5.26

8.41

24th “

6.20

7.27

25th “

5.28

8.39

25th “

6.22

7.25

26th “

5.30

8.37

26th “

6.23

7.23

27th “

5.31

8.35

27th “

6.25

7.20

28th “

5.33

8.33

28th “

6.27

7.18

29th “

5.35

8.30

29th “

6.29

7.15

30th “

5.36

8.28

30th “

6.31

7.13

31st “

5.38

8.26

 

 

 

Lighting-Up Times

Up to and inclusive or the 14th August, add 15 minutes to the evening times and subtract 15 minutes from the morning times given above, from the 15th August, add ½ hour to the evening times and subtract ½ hour from the morning times.

 [Facsimile signature] R. H. Fooks

Chief Constable.

J. W. Ruddock & Sons Ltd., Printers Lincoln 31718


Commentary

From early in the Second World War, after the Fall of France, special constables (part-time volunteer policemen) in Lincolnshire were informed of wartime developments and their morale maintained, by a small (typically 8 pp. 215 x 139 mm) booklet, issued to them monthly, by Lincolnshire Constabulary. The earlier issues were however, foolscap sheets (328 x 203 mm), stapled together at the top left corner. It appeared monthly until No. 27, when restrictions on the use of paper ended its run. It was replaced by occasional (about every two months) issues of the Instructional Pamphlet.

Footnotes

1.^     This is clearly a mistaken reference to item 4, in Pamphlet 4.

2.^    I have no access to Bulletin No. 6. Item 10 of Bulletin 10 deals with the gas known as ‘dick’ and its effects on people but there are no explicit instructions on casualty labelling.

3.^    Abbreviation:- U.X.A.P.B. = Unexploded anti-personnel bomb. These were particularly nasty when they fell among vegetation such as crops. They were difficult to find and the search through acres of corn was very dangerous. So too was harvesting it. Their purpose was not simple nastiness but to disrupt daily routines and so, industrial and agricultural production.

4.^    This was on the site of the present Forest and Woodland Avenues, near Bourne Wood. Grid reference TF085204.

5.^    The jump in times between 14th & 15th August represents the change from double summer time to summer time.


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